The Christian Gospel is the most powerful “meme” ever crafted on this planet.

1/3 of the terrestrial population claims it plays a central role in personal life.

In its most reductionistic form, it takes on a phrase like “Jesus died for our sins.”

Of course, unpacking that phrase theologically could take a lifetime of work.

The problem is, it becomes a language game which can be accepted or rejected without any actual spiritual experience. Isn’t it possible that a person could say yes to it without any real “saving” happening at any meaningful level in his or her life?

Language games don’t need a real God any more than Monopoly boards need a real Atlantic City. They work because they keep their own rules.

This “disconnect” effect becomes even more pronounced with usage; even those who accept the Gospel can face serious diminishing personal returns and even boredom when a reductionistic form of the Gospel is repeated over and over for decades.

For this reason, I wrote the June 2011 Summerside Press novel The Blackberry Bush.

I wanted to explore biblically-responsible atonement models in a medium (fiction) that would allow great freedom of expression.

You see, getting saved or not had to be “real” and believable for Kati and Josh, the protagonists. Just having someone approach them on the beach (props to Mr. Luptak for the image) and presenting them with a reductionistic Gospel would not have been believable to the readers.

And I wanted their “salvation wrestling” to work for two kinds of people:

1) Those who don’t identify with the Christian salvation ‘meme.’

2) Those who have heard it for so long that it no longer really matters to them in real life.

More on this later…

How would you describe salvation without getting reductionistic?

 

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